The Splash

Understanding the Global Harmonization System and What it Means for You

By June 1, 2015, all United States chemical manufacturers and importers are required to adopt the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) new standardized classification and labeling system, The Global Harmonization System (GHS). GHS is an international approach to standardized hazard communication through a single set of hazard ratings, product labels and Safety Data Sheets (SDS).

What does this mean for you?
A standardized way of classifying and labeling chemicals will improve the safety and health of workers through effective communications that are consistent worldwide, improving the understanding of the hazards to ensure appropriate handling and safe use of workplace chemicals. The GHS standardized approach will include detailed criteria for determining what hazardous effects a chemical poses, as well as standardized label elements assigned by hazard class and category.

GHS NewsWhat are the major changes to the Hazard Communication Standard?
Right now, a more severe hazard is indicated by a higher hazard rating. This will change with the new GHS. Workers will now need to watch for a lower hazard rating because it is
associated with a higher risk, and the higher rating is now less of a risk. Along with the hazard rating, pictograms have been added.

When will U.S. Water's Safety Data Sheets and labels be complaint with the new GHS format?
On May 1, 2015 U.S. Water began shipping products with new labels that meet the new standardized GHS criteria; however, during this one month transition, please expect to
receive shipments with either the old MSDS' and labels or the new safety data sheets and labels. Safety Data Sheets can be obtained by contacting U.S. Water Customer Service (1-866-663-7633), contacting your U.S. Water Representative, accessing U.S. Water Reports™ or requested through our website, www.uswaterservices.com